Thursday, May 19, 2016

“THE WOVEN ARC”: ETHELBERT COOPER GALLERY’S FIRST SUMMER SHOW

“THE WOVEN ARC”: ETHELBERT COOPER GALLERY’S FIRST SUMMER SHOW PLAYS WITH THE COMMON ELELMENTS OF TEXT, TEXILES, SCULPTURES, AND MORE

Works by El Anatsui, Grace Ndiritu, Lina Viktor join pieces from permanent collection

Ethelbert Cooper Gallery of African & African American Art presents THE WOVEN ARC, curated by Gallery Director Vera Ingrid Grant, with a special installation of legacy textiles and hats by David Adjaye. 

The exhibition is inspired by recent acquisitions to the galley’s permanent collection and examines the points of relationship between them, revealed in the aesthetics of surface, text and texture. The installation features an array of sculptures, paintings, conceptual art pieces, print works and legacy textiles that Grant describes as “creating a visual dialogue within the exhibit space.” Four works from the Cooper Gallery’s growing permanent collection are part of THE WOVEN ARC, which runs from May 20 through July 16, 2016. A public opening reception begins at 6 PM on May 19. 

The exhibition includes work from Ghanaian sculptor El Anatsui (a 2015 recipient of the Golden Lion Award for Lifetime Achievement), American conceptual artist Glenn Ligon, Namibian woodcutter John Muafangejo, Kenyan mixed-media artist Grace Ndirituand four pieces from British-Liberian conceptual artist Lina Viktor. Pieces from the Cooper Gallery’s permanent collection include a “Soundsuit” from visual and performance artist Nick Cave, “Six by Six” – a painting by mixed-media artist Peter Sacks from his “Aftermath” series, and a “Food Faerie” sculpture by British-Nigerian contemporary artist Yinka ShonibareThe exhibition also includes a special installation of legacy textiles and hats from the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum selected by architect David Adjaye. Additional loans come from The Bronx Museum of the Arts and Jack Shainman Gallery.

“Together these works weave a narrative about social legacies that African and African American artists express and critique with evolving strategies.” Grant says. “Some of the pieces work as critical social metaphors; they all inspire discourse and spin fresh tales.”

The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery102 Mt Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138

The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery is free and open to the public Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 AM to 5 PM. More information about THE WOVEN ARC, including public programming events, is available online at http://www.coopergalleryhc.org/.

The Ethelbert Cooper Gallery for African & African-American Art is a free-to-the-public gallery highlighting contemporary art in exhibitions and installations complemented by free public programming.  Part of the acclaimed Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University, and housed in a space designed by prominent British architect David Adjaye, the Cooper Gallery showcases diverse cultures, archives and historical traditions. Its programming offers local engagements, workshops, artist talks, academic symposia, and lectures.

Wednesday, May 11, 2016

Tuesday, May 3, 2016

On the Periphery – the Edge of Sight

On the Periphery – the Edge of Sight

Art by Rebecca Rose Greene

A Curated Exhibition By Kerri McGill & Ivor Scott
Opening Thursday, 6-8pm, May 5th 2016

767 Centre St, Jamaica Plain, MA
May 5 - 29

"When we focus on an object, a path, a goal, we lose our peripheral vision.
It’s a necessary blindness that provides assistance in concentration.

It is the responsibility of the artist, to pay heed, see deeply, and respond thoughtfully with skill. The artist picks through layers of reality and identity with an awareness of how one informs the other. The artwork offers the impetus for deeper understanding of the world we inhabit.

This exhibit displays art that creates a dynamic visual dialogue and a space that fosters expansive thought. It encourages the viewer to re-inform active sight, to see deeply."

Gallery hours after opening are Sat & Sun 12-6pm


Artists


Ktron
Ivor Scott
Dinora Justice
Sasha Parfenova
Ruth Rosner
C.D.Schoto
Tricia Neumyer
Travis Moonschein
Rich Sepulveda
Rebecca Rose Greene
Kerri McGill
Pecan

Memory Matrix at MIT


Cambridge, MA (May 2, 2016) – In conjunction with the centennial celebration of MIT’s move from Boston to Cambridge – running from Apr 23 to May 7 - the MIT Program in Art, Culture and Technology (ACT) is hosting five guided tours of the Memory Matrix project led by the artist and MIT Assistant Professor Azra Aksamija and invites the public to participate. Created through collaborative and transdisciplinary efforts, this public space installation explores how art and cultural heritage can play a role in promoting greater sensitivity to loss in other countries. At this very moment, our history is being rewritten through the destruction and looting of cultural heritage in Syria, Iraq, Yemen and other regions that are currently suffering acute conflict and crisis. Culture has become a central target of war and conflict because cultural heritage is often powerful evidence of our (co)existence. With this monument-in-the-making, Aksamija and her collaborators are exploring how communities threatened by war can document their material and immaterial heritage as indestructible evidence.
The monument itself is made of border fences carrying over 20,000 small fluorescent Plexiglas elements or “pixels.” These elements are laser cut with holes outlining vanished and threatened heritage from different parts of the world. Each pixel also bears a code that is linked to the project website and databank. The larger matrix of pixels reveals an image of the recently destroyed Arch of Triumph from the ancient city of Palmyra (Syria), made visible through the movement of light and wind. Palmyra is one of the most important cultural centers of the ancient world and was listed as UNESCO World Heritage Site.
The Memory Matrix’s collaborative making process, which involves students from across the campus and beyond, directly references MIT founder William Barton Roger’s vision of hands-on collaboration. It is also inspired by the ethos and tireless peace advocacy of MIT’s 13th President Jeremy Wiesner, after whom the building E15 is named. More than an art installation, the Memory Matrix is a solidarity-building and educational enterprise, and an attempt to seed support for Syrian refugees.
The project was conceived by ACT Assistant Professor Azra Aksamija and is co-developed and produced with the help of a diverse range of partners within the MIT community and participants from the Maker Faire in Cairo and Syrian refugee camps in Jordan

Participate and create new pixels: http://www.memorymatrix.org/


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